Háskóli Íslands

Sníkjudýr staðfest í innfluttum hundum og köttum á Íslandi á árunum 1989 - 2017 ásamt upplýsingum um sníkjudýr sem fundist hafa í hundum og köttum innanlands

TitleSníkjudýr staðfest í innfluttum hundum og köttum á Íslandi á árunum 1989 - 2017 ásamt upplýsingum um sníkjudýr sem fundist hafa í hundum og köttum innanlands
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsSkírnisson, K, Pálsdóttir, GR, Eydal, M
JournalIcelandic Agricultural Sciences
Volume31
Pagination49-63
Abstract

Importing dogs into Iceland was prohibited or restricted from 1909 until 1989, when the ban was lifted and importing dogs and cats permitted, with the proviso of an enforced period of quarantine and the requirement of specific medical treatments and examinations. Prior to importation pets must be treated against cestodes and external parasites. From 1989 until the end of 2017, a total of 3822 dogs and 900 cats were imported from 67 countries from all continents of the world, except Antarctica. Routine examinations for endoparasites revealed one or more species in 10.6% of the dogs and 4.2% of the cats. In spite of the required treatment, ectoparasites were detected on 0.2% of the dogs and 0.2% of the cats. Eighteen endoparasite species and six ectoparasite species have been identified from imported pets. Six species (one nematode, five ectoparasites) are believed to have been introduced to native dogs or cats with imported animals that were apparently still infected/ infested when they left quarantine and were handed over to the owners. Three of them are believed to have been eliminated after a temporary local occurrence, but two or three species of mites have become permanently resident.

 

URL/sites/keldur.is/files/parasites-of-dogs-and-cats-imported-to-iceland-during-1989-2017.pdf
Þú ert að nota: brimir.rhi.hi.is