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Occurrence of Mesocestoides canislagopodis (Rudolphi, 1810) (Krabbe, 1865) in mammals and birds in Iceland and its molecular discrimination within the Mesocestoides species complex

TitleOccurrence of Mesocestoides canislagopodis (Rudolphi, 1810) (Krabbe, 1865) in mammals and birds in Iceland and its molecular discrimination within the Mesocestoides species complex
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsSkírnisson, K, Jouet, D, Ferté, H, Nielsen, ÓK
JournalParasitology Research
Volume115
Issue7
Pagination2597-2607
Abstract
The life cycle of Mesocestoides tapeworms
(Cestoda: Cyclophyllidea: Mesocestoididae) requires three
hosts. The first intermediate host is unknown but believed to
be an arthropod. The second intermediate host is a vertebrate.
The primary definitive host is a carnivore mammal, or a bird
of prey, that eats the tetrathyridium-infected second intermediate
host. One representative of the genus, Mesocestoides
canislagopodis, has been reported from Iceland. It is common
in the arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus) and has also been detected in
domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) and cats (Felis domestica).
Recently, scolices of a non-maturing Mesocestoides sp. have
also been detected in gyrfalcon (Falco rusticolus) intestines,
and tetrathyridia in the body cavity of rock ptarmigan
(Lagopus muta). We examined the taxonomic relationship of
Mesocestoides from arctic fox, gyrfalcon, and rock ptarmigan
using molecular methods, both at the generic level (D1
domain LSU ribosomal DNA) and at the specific level (cytochrome
c oxidase subunit I (COI) and 12S mitochondrial
DNA). All stages belonged to Mesocestoides canislagopodis.
Phylogenetic analysis of the combined 12S-COI at the specific
level confirmed that M. canislagopodis forms a distinct
clade, well separated from three other recognized representatives
of the genus, M. litteratus, M. lineatus, and M. corti/
vogae. This is the first molecular description of this species.
The rock ptarmigan is a new second intermediate host record,
and the gyrfalcon a new primary definitive host record.
However, the adult stage seemed not to be able to mature in
the gyrfalcon, and successful development is probably restricted
to mammalian hosts.
DOI10.1007/s00436-016-5006-5
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